avrelia: (Pensive Queen)
"Authentic" Russian Folktale, Outline Generator v1.0, based on Vladimir Propp theory and work Morphology of the Folktale

http://www.stonedragonpress.com/vladimir_propp/propp_generator_v1.htm

hours and hours of weird crazy fun
avrelia: (a girl)
http://blogs.forbes.com/kiriblakeley/2011/02/17/sports-illustrated-model-irina-shayk-and-the-allure-of-the-russian-girl/

Some people write really weird stuff.

The author believes that In Moscow, every Irina, Nastya, Tanya and Ekaterina is drop dead beautiful.

"So I went to Moscow, and it was true. Everywhere you looked—flawless skin, high cheekbones, perfect noses, pouty lips. Plus, they can walk over ice floes in stiletto heels and Artic temps don’t impede their desire to sashay around in teensy-tiny tube skirts. When they are 16, sure. Then they get some common sense back and start wearing more convenient stuff.

The author is puzzled over that Russian thing and goes to a known expert in Russian women:

I put the question to a dedicated Russo-chick-phile (one wasn’t hard to find). Tyler Wilson, a 32-year-old banker who lives in New York City, has dated over 20 Russian women, the longest relationship lasting 5 months. He often meets them on Russian dating sites. Russian women, he says, have a “cold and mysterious” beauty to them and an “aura of indescribable class.” yeah, he is the expert, all. right. Excuse me while I throw up.

Russian lassies, she informed him, don’t even buy their own cup of coffee. Yes, some do believe something like it. they were raised to believe it is proper for a man to invite on a date and to pay for dinner, and only evil feminists pay for themselves. But it is a double-edged problem, since many men believe that a paid dinner allows them to demand sex in return. :(

He also says that emotiveness is anathema to the ravishing Ruskies. “Don’t show any emotion, positive or negative, with these women,” he warns. What a bunch of crap.

“For some reason, I keep coming back for more,” he swoons. “Everything from their accents to their fur coats sets these women apart Yes, it is very amazing to have an accent. So very exotic. Normal people don't have one. And fur coats - they are warm, you know. Especially in the absence of high-tech down parkas.

I really feel the need of an icon with Illyria's fist...
avrelia: (B-Hero)
http://blogs.forbes.com/kiriblakeley/2011/02/17/sports-illustrated-model-irina-shayk-and-the-allure-of-the-russian-girl/

Some people write really weird stuff.

The author believes that In Moscow, every Irina, Nastya, Tanya and Ekaterina is drop dead beautiful.

"So I went to Moscow, and it was true. Everywhere you looked—flawless skin, high cheekbones, perfect noses, pouty lips. Plus, they can walk over ice floes in stiletto heels and Artic temps don’t impede their desire to sashay around in teensy-tiny tube skirts. When they are 16, sure. Then they get some common sense back and start wearing more convenient stuff.

The author is puzzled over that Russian thing and goes to a known expert in Russian women:

I put the question to a dedicated Russo-chick-phile (one wasn’t hard to find). Tyler Wilson, a 32-year-old banker who lives in New York City, has dated over 20 Russian women, the longest relationship lasting 5 months. He often meets them on Russian dating sites. Russian women, he says, have a “cold and mysterious” beauty to them and an “aura of indescribable class.” yeah, he is the expert, all. right. Excuse me while I throw up.

Russian lassies, she informed him, don’t even buy their own cup of coffee. Yes, some do believe something like it. they were raised to believe it is proper for a man to invite on a date and to pay for dinner, and only evil feminists pay for themselves. But it is a double-edged problem, since many men believe that a paid dinner allows them to demand sex in return. :(

He also says that emotiveness is anathema to the ravishing Ruskies. “Don’t show any emotion, positive or negative, with these women,” he warns. What a bunch of crap.

“For some reason, I keep coming back for more,” he swoons. “Everything from their accents to their fur coats sets these women apart Yes, it is very amazing to have an accent. So very exotic. Normal people don't have one. And fur coats - they are warm, you know. Especially in the absence of high-tech down parkas.

I really feel the need of an icon with Illyria's fist...
avrelia: (Cabaret)
I am perpetually amazed how the view on US politics is changing depending where are you looking from.

From Russia democrats and republicans looked pretty much indistinguishable. Their differences trifle and in international relations hardly noticeable.

In Canada we got used to Canadian politics, obviously. That most of the time looked safe and boring comparing to, say, Russia, but also we could see democracy working more or less for people and not against them. Occasionally there happened soap opera events, and we were excessively diverted. US politics became understandable and exciting. Democrats started to look normal, republicans started to look kind of strange.

Now, I was amazed, how much the whole Canadian political discourse is leftier than US one. Stephen Harper from here looks kind of more liberal than Barak Obama. I am also surprised how many our acquaintances here are republicans or drawn to republicanism - all well-educated middle class people. All emigrated from former USSR as Jewish refugees in 90s or later, as professionals.

and I feel very socialist and very Canadian.

I also feel Russian, but Russian politics depresses me to no end. I cannot use words acceptable in a polite society to talk about it.
avrelia: (Berty)
out of nowhere we hear the sound of fireworks. Looking out of the window confirms the majestic fireworks somewhere in the Central park. Raking my head for the possible reasons for the show the very first thing that comes to mind - of course, tomorrow is November 7, the October revolution anniversary... yeah...

then the brain turns on, and I remember (1) we are in New York, NY, USA; (2) even in Moscow they don't have the fireworks on this day; (3) it would have be tomorrow anyway.

it was, by the way a part of Marathon Eve Experience. D. was mightily impressed and called for more stars long after it was over.

random morning view from our window )
avrelia: (Лошадка)
записала, наконец, бабушкины воспоминания про 22 июня и войну. По памяти, каких-то деталей уже не помню и взять не откуда. Бабушка рассказывала немало, но не рассказывала гораздо больше.

http://a-yurievna.livejournal.com/7700.html
avrelia: (Mirror)
I occasionally look through LifeHacker striving to improve my productivity. It leads to more waste of time, but for a good cause.

But this day I had a blast from a past with this, rather useful advice: How to re-purpose old pantyhose. The very same advices I used to see in the old women's magazines I read in Soviet Union during perestroyka. We didn't have an overabundance of stuff in the stores then, so we usually did everything out of everything else, didn't throw away packaging, old pantyhose, and newspapers and re-purposed anything that could be re-purposed. And yes, we did keep onions in pantyhose.

So yeah.. it gives me a certain perspective on life in USA

They also advise to make Sbiten. I concur. It is supposed to be good. ;)
avrelia: (Intellectual)
Для тех, кто предпочел бы читать меня на русском языке, сообщение:

Я создала себе новый журнал [livejournal.com profile] a_yurievna, где я, собственно и пишу по-русски. Заходите, читайте, пишите. Не знаю как пойдет параллельное писание, но вот захотелось. В этом журнал как-то регулярно переходить на русский не получается. Думаю, впрочем, давать здесь ссылки, если там случится что интересное написать. В общем, добро пожаловать!
avrelia: (Ship of wonders)
I feel like the most boring poster ever - tuning in to wish belated birthdays and going away to miss some more stuff.

Today's belated birthday wishes are going to [livejournal.com profile] lisalamona and [livejournal.com profile] treacle_a. I hope you have a wonderful year ahead!

We are sitting at home and enjoying a lazy holiday Monday. Well, I am also trying to create a poem for my creative writing class and husband does some work. Still, it's a very feel-good morning, turning into a feel-good afternoon.

Except for the poetry thing. I am coming up with a strange creature of English-Russian mess. The worst thing is that I need 250 words, which is too many for a poem - in my opinion. Poetry is economical, images, emotions and thoughts are distilled. I shouldn't have to add words...

Recent lucky find - [livejournal.com profile] russkij_sever. Highly recommended to go and have a look - a community devoted to the Russian North, one of my favourite place on Earth. It is in Russian, but the best thing is the gorgeous pictures that you can enjoy without need to read anything there.

Yesterday we went to see Shrek the Third and Here is the reaction- with spoilers: )
avrelia: (Default)
I’ve finished reading Doctor Zhivago. RE-reading, I should say – I read it first at school, when I was s sixteen, and had a vague memory of something slow, sad, and calm – with the wonderful poems at the end. I remembered this poems much better than the actual book, and recently, having found the book in the library (in Russian) I grabbed and started reading.

It is funny how me reading habits change since my LJ involvement – and reading reviews of books, TV shows, movies, and writing the reviews myself. I notice so many things, and I get annoyed by many more things – or may be I can pinpoint what I am being annoyed with.

So, Doctor Zhivago: I was annoyed with a lot of things: I was annoyed with the wandering point of view, with constant telling instead of showing, with the fact that many characters, supposedly important, seemed shadows, not people (what kind of person was Tonya? What was about Yuri’s uncle, Nikolai Nikolaevich? There was supposedly deep friendship between Yuri, Michael Gordon and Tonya – and I couldn’t see it and so on.) All the Fresh Deep Thoughts bored me to death, what was the turning point of Yuri’s attitude towards the revolution? Now he likes it, now he doesn’t.

In the second part of the book people annoyed me - mostly Zhivago and Lara- with their actions, lack of actions, and big pronouncements…

And yet I liked the book – again, and I liked it a lot. Why is that? I can be annoyed with this and that – and then, the sudden turn of phrase, the words are put together so right that everything comes alive and I believe in every word, and forgive all the annoyances I was harboring.

I love all the long descriptions – cities big and small, random people caught into the story, storms, nights, springs, wolves and the rowan-tree – all this is so bright and clear, and alive, so crispy-cold and sweet as the water from the well, so loving and magnificent that I forget the supposedly main characters for it.

Somewhere in the middle it came to me – the realization that this book is not a novel.

Not a novel at all: it is a song - slow, sad, and calm, even if events it is describing are as far from calm as possible.

And the figure of the Author – behind the text, but ever so often intruding in the story with his notes, explanations, references of the future events and pronounced judgments suddenly is looking like a half-mythological Storyteller /Bard/ Boyan.

Another thing I noticed – how I cannot reconcile the fictional Moscow there (and in other books) with Moscow I know – I know all the places that the action goes on, but I cannot imagine the characters on the streets I walked. Well, with all these years and all these changes those are very streets indeed, but still the existence of several unconnected Moscows in my head is confounding.

Oh, and the poems – as wonderful as ever. I manage to restrain myself from reading them before finishing the previous chapters, and I can see how beautifully done this structure is – the characters are gone, but they continue in the poetry now and forever. And all the talk about how talented Zhivago is stopped being talk, and the previous chapter suddenly got a new colour as I cast Zhivago as hamlet and Gordon and Dudorov as Guildenstern and Rosencrantz.

One more thing – as much as I like the poems it is mind-boggling to figure out who wrote them? Zhivago? Pasternak writing as if he were Zhivago? Pasternak as himself? Poetry seems so personal, so the mimicry I find impossible, and the idea of writing perfectly good poems written by the fictional character is unsettling. On the other hand, I’ve never tried it – may be it is not?

Next books to read:

Emma Bull “A War For The Oaks
Lev Tolstoy “War and Piece
avrelia: (Default)
Other than that the mean cold has cauhgt with me, and I feel disgusting. I should be doing fun stuff, yet I don't. Slowly writing several long posts, that I eventually hope to post this weekend - if I have time, because it is looking to be busy.

Or, and it is the Christmas Eve for me, finally. I don't do anything specific, and I would be really confused if anyone asked me to do something, but I still consider this day special.

Several years ago (10-14 years ago) I would be fortune-telling right now - using various weird means like burning paper on a skillet and others. The way of surviving Russian customs boggles me to no end.

Our pagan ways managed well through Christianity, and state-approved atheism, and all kinds of enlightenment. I mean, it is not what it was before, but when I think of origins of some stuff, I realize that it goes a way back, so way, it isn’t funny. But, I guess, other cultures have their pagan rudiments as well – I mean not in books, in myths, in but in the general life habits.
avrelia: (Default)
I tried to do this meme yesterday, and here I tried the descriptions of Russians – and those were some strange descriptions, because none of them fits me. By the method of trial and error I figured out that I am Romanian. Who knew?

Look for yourself: Read more... )
avrelia: (Default)
As the title suggest, the second part of the notes on my visit to Moscow.

Read more... )
avrelia: (Ratio by dtissagirl)
I stumbled upon this site with personality tests recently, and tested myself with enthusiasm better suited for something useful. Behold the results – they say that I am a very rare animal. Hmmm…

INTP - "Architect". Greatest precision in thought and language. Can readily discern contradictions and inconsistencies. The world exists primarily to be understood. 3.3% of total population.
Take Free Myers-Briggs Personality Test


First of the most enjoyable jobs for my type as listed here: intellectual property attorney

:: giggles::

Household news update: the stove is fine – the building owner came and fixed it. We finally bought curtains – after half a year of living with the windows on the western side. Yay us! No more hiding between 4 and 6 PM. Today we suddenly remembered that this week is the Maslenitsa (The Butter Week), and we are supposed to make and eat pancakes, so now we are full of pancakes. It feels good.

In case anybody wondered about the necessity of eating pancakes: )
avrelia: (Default)
There was an explosion in Moscow subway last week. A terrorist attack, apparently. It was in the morning, so the train was packed.

cut for bitterness )
avrelia: (Default)
Yesterday was The Wild Anastasia Day - the date, celebrated once by 6 people; the date remembered now with the bittersweet aroma of
nostalgia.

It was a celebration of an unabashed silliness, joy of creating unimportant stuff, and friendship.

If you really want to know, Read more... )</lj-cut

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